The Semantics of Vervet Monkey Alarm Calls: Part I

Anti-predatory alarm calls are important  for social animals to alert others of approaching predators. Without the presence of "language", some non-human primates are known to give out different predator-specific alarm calls to alert conspecific. These non-human primates include ring-tailed lemurs (Zuberbühler et al., 1999), white-faced capuchin monkeys (Fichtel et al., 2005), Diana monkeys (Zuberbühler, 1999), Campbell's monkeys... Continue Reading →

Contagious Yawning in Chimpanzees

Animation of chimpanzee yawning from Emory University. Illustration from BBC News. I'm sure we are all familiar with this scenario: Someone yawns and we would "catch" it or vice versa. This is the phenomenon of contagious yawning. A new paper from The Proceedings of The Royal Society "Computer animations stimulate contagious yawning in chimpanzees" suggests... Continue Reading →

The Fongoli Chimps of Senegal

A Fongoli chimp. Photo by Frans Lanting, National Geographic. I just stumbled upon this on Twitter (Thanks to DarwinMonkey). It's a National Geographic page about the Senegalese Fongoli chimps, named after the Fongoli stream that runs through the chimpanzee's range. There are videos showing these chimps using tools fishing for termites, hunting a bushbaby and... Continue Reading →

Humans Evolved From Tree Climbers

A research from Duke University by Daniel Schmitt, associate professor of evolutionary anthropology, and Tracy Kivell, a post-doctoral research associate, shows that human evolved from tree climbing ancestors, not from knuckle-walkers. Schmitt and Kivell examined and compared the wrist bones of humans and African apes. Their research, "Independent evolution of knuckle-walking in African apes shows... Continue Reading →

No Sex Can do The Muriquis Harm

Muriquis feeding and resting. Photo from Primate Info Net. The muriquis, or woolly spider monkeys live in the rain forest of Brazil. They are considered peaceful individuals but an intra-community lethal attack had left researchers to reconsider how peaceful these monkeys are and why such attack occurred. The image of peaceful individuals mainly stemmed from... Continue Reading →

Add DNApes to your bookmarks or RSS Feed

I just stumbled upon a new-to-me primatology blog that I wanted to share with you. The blog, DNApes, comes from Mimi Arandjelovic, a graduate student at the Max Planck power house of anthropology and is chock full of good posts. Mimi studies variation in male-transmitted Y-chromosome of gorillas, which is extremely important given that gorillas... Continue Reading →

A WordPress.com Website.

Up ↑