Gorilla Group Size & Dynamics Mimic Human Group Size & Dynamics

A study was published several days ago in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B examining the social relationships among 13 mountain gorilla groups in Rwadna over 12 years. Typically, mountain gorillas have social groups of 12 to 20 individuals. A group of this size often yields the most diversity in relationships. Mountain gorillas... Continue Reading →

Wild Gorilla Happy Meal Time Songs

Many animals, including chimpanzees and bonobos, have food related calls... But aside from anecdotal reports, there was no evidence of this behavior in gorillas, until now. A new paper in PLoS One documents that the wild western lowland gorillas in the Republic of the Congo sing and hum when eating, as a way to express... Continue Reading →

A newborn baby Western lowland gorilla naps in the arms of Frala, its mother at Sydney’s Taronga Zoo. It is about a week old and we don't know if the new addition is male or female.

The first complete genetic map of the mountain gorilla was published several days ago. It is the most extensive genetic analysis of mountain gorillas ever conducted. The importance of it cannot be stressed due to the fact that mountain gorillas are critically endangered. With such small numbers, and the risk of extinction, they are burdened... Continue Reading →

Gorilla Baby Talk

Eva Maria Luëf and Katja Liebal of the Free University of Berlin have published in the American Journal of Primatology a new paper documenting the occurrence of motheresein 24 captive lowland gorillas. During a 4 month observation of these gorillas, it was observed that elder gorillas used different gestures to start and stop play. To... Continue Reading →

Gameboy Gorilla

This image puts a whole new perspective to the Nintendo classic game, Donkey Kong. At the San Fransisco Zoo, a boy dropped his Nintendo DS into the gorilla enclosure. The following happened. I'm particularly loving the little one's expression and body language. From Spicuzza Photo Today blog by way of Gamesradar and The Escapist

Humans Evolved From Tree Climbers

A research from Duke University by Daniel Schmitt, associate professor of evolutionary anthropology, and Tracy Kivell, a post-doctoral research associate, shows that human evolved from tree climbing ancestors, not from knuckle-walkers. Schmitt and Kivell examined and compared the wrist bones of humans and African apes. Their research, "Independent evolution of knuckle-walking in African apes shows... Continue Reading →

Great Apes LOL Like Human Too

A baby orangutan being tickled. Photo from Discovery News. We're not the only species that are capable of laughing according to new study. Great apes are able to laugh like humans too, and they do it frequenty. This finding suggests that the last common ancestor of humans and apes also laughed around 10 to 16... Continue Reading →

A WordPress.com Website.

Up ↑