The Semantics of Vervet Monkey Alarm Calls: Part I

Anti-predatory alarm calls are important  for social animals to alert others of approaching predators. Without the presence of "language", some non-human primates are known to give out different predator-specific alarm calls to alert conspecific. These non-human primates include ring-tailed lemurs (Zuberbühler et al., 1999), white-faced capuchin monkeys (Fichtel et al., 2005), Diana monkeys (Zuberbühler, 1999), Campbell's monkeys... Continue Reading →

Free conservation biology textbook

Free conservation biology textbook Sodhi, N. S. and P. R. Ehrlich (Eds.). 2010. Conservation Biology for All. Oxford University Press. Available online at: http://www.mongabay.com/conservation-biology-for-all.html "The authors published Conservation Biology for All in a free and open access format in an effort to make conservation knowledge available to as many people as possible." Free conservation biology textbook:... Continue Reading →

Orangutan Behavior during the Rehabilitation Process

By Kristin Abt   A recent article "Fostering Appropriate Behavior in Rehabilitant Orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus)" published online in the International Journal of Primatology discusses research on the behavior of rehabilitant orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus and P. abelii) at the Orangutan Care and Quarantine Centre in Pangkalan Bun, Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo). Much past research has focused on postrelease behavior... Continue Reading →

Spotlight on the Urban Ecology of Long-tailed Macaques

The study of conservation biology, and its oft-times competitor - urbanization, is increasingly relevant to the study of primatology. As a species, long-tailed macaques demonstrate a number of conflicts and potential implications of the urbanization occurring in primate-habitat countries. The long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis) is the third-most common primate in the world with an extensive range... Continue Reading →

Orangutan Genome Sequenced

The orangutan genome has been sequenced and published in today's Nature. The paper, "Comparative and demographic analysis of orang-utan genomes," is open access for you to read for yourself. I'll be highlighting some of the high points in this post. Devin Locke, a structural geneticist at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri,... Continue Reading →

Introducing A New Guest Blogger, Kristin Abt

Kristin Abit is a new guest blogger here at Primatology.net. She is currently a Master's student, studying Sustainable Development and Conservation Biology at the University of Maryland. Her undergraduate degree was in Biology and Psychology from Loyola University, also in Maryland. Kristin has over 5 years of experience in the zoo field as an animal keeper.... Continue Reading →

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